Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe, Our Lady of Guadalupe - Patroness for Suffering and Compassion. Invoked in General Favors, in Sickness and Against Evil, Particularly War.

Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe, Our Lady of Guadalupe - Patroness for Suffering and Compassion. Invoked in General Favors, in Sickness and Against Evil, Particularly War.

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Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe, Our Lady of Guadalupe - Patroness for Suffering and Compassion. Invoked in General Favors, in Sickness and Against Evil, Particularly War. 

In 1531, in Mexico, the Virgin Mary appeared to an Indian man, Juan Diego, saying she would help the native people if Juan would go to the bishop and ask him to build a chapel to her, on the hill where she now appeared. Juan Diego did as he was asked but the bishop did not believe him. He asked for a sign. The Virgin promised Juan she would give him a sign the next morning. He awoke to find his uncle dying. He ran to town for help but the Virgin stopped him, saying she had already healed his uncle and asked Juan to come back for the sign. When he did, the Virgin gave him roses, though it was winter, and told him to wrap them in his tilma. As Juan presented these to the bishop, the roses fell to the floor, and there on his tilma was the image of our Lady of Guadalupe.

"Our Lady of Guadalupe, Mother of perpetual help, you have been blessed and favored of god. We come to you today as your loving children. Watch over us and take care of us. As you held the child Jesus in your arms so take us in your arms. Protect and keep us safe in all we endeavor to do."

About the Artist

Lynn Garlick started carving, painting, and producing her retablos in 1993. Her workshop is located in the high desert town of Taos, New Mexico, a landscape richly steeped in religious iconography and history. The retablo, or ʻboard behind the alterʼ, was originally created in New Mexico in the 1800ʼs in response to the lack of Bibles and Icons being sent from the church in Rome. The Santero (saint maker) painted retablos from pigment collected and ground from the local surroundings. The boards were hand hewed usually of ponderosa pine or tin. The practice has carried down through the generations and is still done this way today. Lynn paints her originals retablos on traditional pine boards carving and then paints them. To create her production work the images are mounted on baltic birch.